Going Inside a Civil War Era Farmhouse

Civil War Cabin
Giant Black Walnut trees frame this mid-19th century farmhouse in the northwest mountains of Rutherford County in this image from this morning. Located a mile west of the historic Rutherford Trace trail of Revolutionary War fame, this two story farmstead was the home to four generations of the Connor family, and, although currently unoccupied, remains in the same family today. Other than indoor plumbing, a metal roof, and electrical wiring, the house has been preserved in its original state.

The rear of the house has a view of the old barn.

The rear of the house contains the kitchen and bath chamber. These were added on to the original house a hundred years ago. The old barn is across the meadow.

Appalachian farmhouse chimney

Appalachian Farmstead
This March 2015 image shows the hand stacked rock chimney, and the original unpainted exterior boards, all cut from trees that existed on the site. Recent porch repair indicates that the family might be preparing to occupy the old house again. Water originally came from Otter Creek, that flows near the rear of the house.
Otter Creek Cascades
This six foot cascade is just 100 yards behind the house. A constant supply of water played an important role in the longevity of the farm, and the ruins of an old water mill are visible just downstream. Two large mill stones stand in the front yard.

One of two Mill Stones in the front yard.

One of two Mill Stones in the front yard.



By chance during one of my walks last November, I found the back door slightly open…
The porch is new, but the walls are original.

The porch is new, but the walls are original.

…and after yelling and knocking, I knew that no one was there. I went inside and found perfectly preserved plank walls, floor, and ceiling.
Appalachian Living room You have to imagine the interior without this furniture. The wood is most likely Southern White Pine, which is still prevalent in the surrounding forest. The doorway leads to a bed chamber. Notice the construction of the doors. Very original. The front door is on the left.

The stairs are behind a low door. The kitchen is through the open door.

The stairs to the second bed chamber are behind a low door. The kitchen is through the open door.


The parlour has the original fireplace, where all cooking was done before the kitchen was added. It has been refitted with a wood stove.

The Parlor has the original fireplace, where all cooking was done before the kitchen was added. It was refitted with a wood stove.

The ceiling is low, and the double hung windows replaced original shutters.

The pine is beautifully hand rubbed and sealed. The scent of wood is very strong.

The pine is beautifully hand rubbed and sealed. The scent of wood is very strong.


So many of these old farm houses were lost to fire and abandonment. Think of all the solitary stone chimneys you have seen while driving through the mountains. How rare that one of these treasures has survived so intact.
Appalachian Farm Family
Two Appalachian farm women in the 1930’s beside their log house.

3 thoughts on “Going Inside a Civil War Era Farmhouse

  1. That is definitely a neat old house.thanks for sharing Patsy From: Living in The Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina- A Blog To: pjcar119@yahoo.com Sent: Sunday, August 30, 2015 1:43 PM Subject: [New post] Going Inside a Civil War Era Farmhouse #yiv4030872991 a:hover {color:red;}#yiv4030872991 a {text-decoration:none;color:#0088cc;}#yiv4030872991 a.yiv4030872991primaryactionlink:link, #yiv4030872991 a.yiv4030872991primaryactionlink:visited {background-color:#2585B2;color:#fff;}#yiv4030872991 a.yiv4030872991primaryactionlink:hover, #yiv4030872991 a.yiv4030872991primaryactionlink:active {background-color:#11729E;color:#fff;}#yiv4030872991 WordPress.com | Carolina Vann posted: “Giant Black Walnut trees frame this mid-19th century farmhouse in the northwest mountains of Rutherford County in this image from this morning. Located a mile west of the historic Rutherford Trace trail of Revolutionary War fame, this two story farmstea” | |

  2. Keith, Thank you for your thoughtful comment. I know where you are coming from. My photos are not meant to be documentary. I am an artist who paints, and I want my photos to reflect my passion for composition, clarity, and color. The human eye is remarkable in the detail and variations that it can process. Most camera exposures do not begin to capture that level of beauty. I am influenced by the great 19th century painters of the Hudson River School, and I want to portray each scene the way they painted. What you call over processing, others see as artistic liberty. To each his own. I hope that you will follow my blog, and see my work for what it is; art, not simply photography. People don’t like to hang “regular” photos on their walls, but they want to display a fantasy of a scene that they never tire of looking at. The people who purchase my work are looking for a specific style, and that’s what I offer.

    If you have a chance, check out my painting website, and see how my mind interprets historic landscapes.

    http://www.miami-art.com

    Thank you for taking the time to write. Vann Helms

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